Advanced Composite Materials: Examples of Design, Fabrication, Characterization and Simulation
Presented by Kenan Song, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Tuesday, May 16, 2017
9–10 a.m.
Peralta Hall (PRLTA) 120, Polytechnic campus [map]

Abstract

Advanced composite materials (AMCs), especially nanoparticle-reinforced polymer composites (NpRPCs), exhibit desirable physical and chemical properties that include low density coupled with directed high stiffness and strength, optimal dimensional stability, superior temperature and chemical resistance, as well as relatively cost-efficient manufacturing. These AMCs have broad applications in robotics, aerospace, automobile, and sporting equipment industries. Inventing scalable processing techniques and applying currently available approaches to fabricate novel material systems allow for bridging the nanoscale features of fillers to microscale structures and eventual extension to the macroscale composite properties for producing usable systems and devices. Precise control of processing factors including (i) preserving intact nanoparticle geometries, (ii) uniform dispersion of the nanoparticles in polymers, (iii) effective matrix-filler interfacial interactions at molecular level, and (iv) alignment/orientation of the nanoparticle and/or polymer chains all can contribute to the superior properties of the composites. Discussions of such processing-structure relationship will be the focus of this talk. In particular, both thermoplastic and thermoset polymers have been used for scalable fabrication of composite fibers and coatings. In addition, detailed exploration regarding the manufactured microstructure using experimental and simulation methods is conducted to fundamentally understand the microstructure-property relationship in these polymer-based composite systems. These fundamental results will also be discussed as they pertain to improving composite manufacturing and performances.

About the speaker

Kenan Song is currently holding a Postdoc Associate position at MIT, jointly affiliated with the Department of Materials Science and Engineering, and Department of Chemical Engineering. Song obtained his doctoral degree in Mechanical Engineering from Northeastern University (Boston, MA) in 2014, and bachelor’s in Engineering Mechanics as well as minor in International Economic Law in 2010. Song’s research interest includes the processing-structure-property relationships in advanced composite materials (AMCs). Specifically, Song’s research is focused on the manufacturing, characterization, simulation, and application of polymer-based nanoparticle-filled composites, aiming for high performance in structural and functional utilizations. Nanoparticles of interest include one-dimensional nanotubes, two-dimensional nanochips, and zero-dimensional nanospheres. Song has filed 2 patents, contributed 4 book chapters, and published 12 papers on journals including ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces, Carbon, and Polymer. He serves as a reviewer and on the editorial board for ACS, MRS, AIP, Elsevier, Springer, and Wiley peer-reviewed journals and conference proceedings. Song is a member of the Society of Plastic Engineers (SPE), Society for the Advancement of Materials and Process Engineering (SAMPE), American Institute of Chemical Engineers (AIChE), American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME), Society of Manufacturing Engineers (SME), American Chemical Society (ACS), and Materials Research Society (MRS).

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